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Darrell L. Hunter, II
(614) 207-2342
Darrell.Hunter@e-merge.com
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Darrell L. Hunter, II
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(614) 207-2342
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e-merge.com
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WELCOME TO YOUR NEW HOME IN THE VILLAGE OF MINERVA PARK



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DID YOU KNOW: that the Village of Minerva Park originally began as an Amusement Park in 1895? Nearly 45 years later the city of Minerva Park was officially incorporated in its current and commonly known area!

 Minerva Amusement Park

 7-13-1895 to 7-27-1902

 For seven glorious summers, laughter and gaiety rang forth from the first amusement park in Franklin  County. With intoxicants  banned, the Park was enjoyed by the “respectable” folk of the Gay ’90s—the  stone water tower/jail was quick to house any  ruffian who threatened disharmony. Delighting young  and old were the Zoological Garden, Ornithological Museum, the Scenic  Railway roller coaster, Shoot  the Chutes (the water slide of its day), swimming, boating, baseball, bowling, concerts, dancing,  picnics,  strolls in the cool woodlands, pony rides, fireworks, the orchestrion replicating a 36-piece orchestra,  grande vaudeville,  and theater. Minerva Park’s popularity faded with the opening of Olentangy Park,  only 3 miles from downtown Columbus.

 
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The original dance pavilion burned in September 1896. It was thought by some to be the result of an incendiary, but the  manager attributed the fire to a cigar stump being thrown in the rubbish under the pavilion. This new “Casino” was  constructed in only 37 days, just in time for the opening of the third season on June 27, 1897. It measured 242’ by 116’, with encircling verandas of 16’ and 25’. With “all games of chance or gambling of any kind prohibited,” the Casino was not a gambling house. Offering a 3,500-seat theatre, orchestra circle, restaurants, and gallery, it showcased the finest vaudeville acts of the time. The season ran from May to September.